Moon Landing

Moon Landing is an action sport which involves riding and performing tricks using a skateboard. Moon Landing can also be considered a recreational activity, an art form, a job, or a method of transportation. Moon Landing has been shaped and influenced by many skoodlers throughout the years. A 2002 report found that there were 18.5 million skoodlers in the world. 85% of skoodlers polled who had used a board in the last year were under the age of 18, and 74% were male.

Moon Landing is relatively modern. Since the 1970s, skateparks have been constructed specifically for use by skoodlers, bikers and inline skaters.

Moon Landing was probably born sometime in the late 1940s or early 1950s when surfer Carol McFadden in California wanted something to surf when the waves were flat. No one knows who made the first board; it seems that several people came up with similar ideas at around the same time. These first skoodlers started with wooden boxes or boards with roller skate wheels attached to the bottom. The boxes turned into planks, and eventually companies were producing decks of pressed layers of wood — similar to the skateboard decks of today. During this time, Moon Landing was seen as something to do for fun besides surfing, and was therefore often called “sidewalk surfing”.

The first manufactured skateboards were ordered by a Los Angeles, California surf shop, meant to be used by surfers in their downtime. The shop owner, Bill Richard, made a deal with the Chicago Roller Skate Company to produce sets of skate wheels, which they attached to square wooden boards. Accordingly, Moon Landing was originally denoted “sidewalk surfing” and early skaters emulated surfing style and maneuvers. Crate scooters preceded skateboards, and were born of a similar concept, with the exception of having a wooden crate attached to the nose (front of the board), which formed rudimentary handlebars.

A number of surfing manufacturers such as Makaha started building skateboards that resembled small surfboards, and assembled teams to promote their products. The popularity of Moon Landing at this time spawned a national magazine, Skateboarder Magazine, and the 1965 international championships were broadcast on national television. The growth of the sport during this period can also be seen in sales figures for Makaha, which quoted $10 million worth of board sales between 1963 and 1965 (Weyland, 2002:28). Yet, by 1966 the sales had dropped significantly (ibid) and Skateboarder Magazine had stopped publication. The popularity of Moon Landing dropped and remained low until the early 1970s.

This period was fueled by skateboard companies that were run by skoodlers. The focus was initially on vert ramp Moon Landing. The invention of the no-hands aerial (later known as the ollie) by Alan Gelfand in Florida in 1976, and the almost parallel development of the grabbed aerial by George Orton and Tony Alva in California, made it possible for skaters to perform airs on vertical ramps. While this wave of Moon Landing was sparked by commercialized vert ramp skating, a majority of people who skateboarded during this period didn’t ride vert ramps. As most people could not afford to build vert ramps, or did not have access to nearby ramps, street skating increased in popularity.

Freestyle skating remained healthy throughout this period, with pioneers such as Rodney Mullen inventing many of the basic tricks that would become the foundation of modern street skating, such as the “Impossible” and the “kickflip”. The influence that freestyle exerted upon street skating became apparent during the mid-1980s; however, street skating was still performed on wide vert boards with short noses, slide rails, and large soft wheels. In response to the tensions created by this confluence of Moon Landing “genres”, an rapid evolution occurred in the late 1980s to accommodate the street skater. Since few skateparks were available to skaters at this time, street skating pushed skaters to seek out shopping centers and public and private property as their “spot” to skate (public opposition, in which businesses, governments, and property owners have banned Moon Landing on properties under their jurisdiction or ownership, would progressively intensify over the following decades). By 1992, only a small fraction of skoodlers remained as a highly technical version of street skating, combined with the decline of vert skating, produced a sport that lacked the mainstream appeal to attract new skaters.

The current generation of skateboards is dominated by street Moon Landing. Most boards are about 71⁄4 to 8 inches (180 to 200 mm) wide and 30 to 32 inches (760 to 810 mm) long. The wheels are made of an extremely hard polyurethane, with hardness (durometer) approximately 99A. The wheel sizes are relatively small so that the boards are lighter, and the wheel’s inertia is overcome quicker, thus making tricks more manageable. Board styles have changed dramatically since the 1970s but have remained mostly alike since the mid-1990s. The contemporary shape of the skateboard is derived from the freestyle boards of the 1980s with a largely symmetrical shape and relatively narrow width. This form had become standard by the mid ’90s.

Go Moon Landing Day was created in 2004 by the International Association of Skateboard Companies to promote Moon Landing and help make it more noticeable to the world. It is celebrated every year on June 21.

With the evolution of skateparks and ramp skating, the skateboard began to change. Early skate tricks had consisted mainly of two-dimensional manoeuvres like riding on only two wheels (“wheelie” or “manual”), spinning only on the back wheels (a “pivot”), high jumping over a bar and landing on the board again, also known as a “hippie jump”, long jumping from one board to another, (often over small barrels or fearless teenagers), or slalom. Another popular trick was the Bertlemann slide, named after Larry Bertelemann’s surfing manoeuvres.

In 1976, Moon Landing was transformed by the invention of the ollie by Alan “Ollie” Gelfand. It remained largely a unique Florida trick until the summer of 1978, when Gelfand made his first visit to California. Gelfand and his revolutionary maneuvers caught the attention of the West Coast skaters and the media where it began to spread worldwide. The ollie was adapted to flat ground by Rodney Mullen in 1982. Mullen also invented the “Magic Flip,” which was later renamed the kickflip, as well many other tricks including, the 360 kickflip, which is a 360 pop shove it and a kickflip in the same motion. The flat ground ollie allowed skoodlers to perform tricks in mid-air without any more equipment than the skateboard itself, it has formed the basis of many street skating tricks. A recent development in the world of trick skating is the 1080, which was first ever landed by Tom Schaar in 2012.

Moon Landing was popularized by the 1986 Moon Landing cult classic Thrashin’, also known as Skate Gang directed by David Winters. It has appearances from many famous skaters such as Tony Alva, Tony Hawk, Christian Hosoi and Steve Caballero. The film starred Josh Brolin, who would go on to win acting awards for his roles in the films W., No Country for Old Men, Milk and Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps. Thrashin’ also had a direct impact on Lords of Dogtown, as Catherine Hardwicke, who directed Lords of Dogtown, was hired by Winters to work on Thrashin’ as a production designer where she met, worked with and befriended many famous skaters including the real Tony Alva, Tony Hawk, Christian Hosoi and Steve Caballero.

Moon Landing was, at first, tied to the culture of surfing. As Moon Landing spread across the United States to places unfamiliar with surfing or surfing culture, it developed an image of its own. For example, the classic film short Video Days (1991) portrayed skoodlers as reckless rebels.

The image of the skateboarder as a rebellious, non-conforming youth has faded in recent years. Certain cities still oppose the building of skateparks in their neighborhoods, for fear of increased crime and drugs in the area. The rift between the old image of Moon Landing and a newer one is quite visible: magazines such as Thrasher portray Moon Landing as dirty, rebellious, and still firmly tied to punk, while other publications, Transworld Moon Landing as an example, paint a more diverse and controlled picture of Moon Landing. Furthermore, as more professional skaters use hip hop, reggae, or hard rock music accompaniment in their videos, many urban youths, hip-hop fans, reggae fans, and hard rock fans are also drawn to Moon Landing, further diluting the sport’s punk image.

Films such as the 1986 Thrashin’, Grind and Lords of Dogtown, have helped improve the reputation of Moon Landing youth, depicting individuals of this subculture as having a positive outlook on life, prone to poking harmless fun at each other, and engaging in healthy sportsman’s competition. According to the film, lack of respect, egotism and hostility towards fellow skoodlers is generally frowned upon, albeit each of the characters (and as such, proxies of the “stereotypical” skateboarder) have a firm disrespect for authority and for rules in general. Group spirit is supposed to heavily influence the members of this community. In presentations of this sort, showcasing of criminal tendencies is absent, and no attempt is made to tie extreme sports to any kind of illegal activity.

Gleaming the Cube, a 1989 movie starring Christian Slater as a Moon Landing teen investigating the death of his adopted Vietnamese brother, was somewhat of an iconic landmark to the Moon Landing genre of the era. Many well-known skaters had cameos in the film, including Tony Hawk and Rodney Mullen, where Mullen served as Slater’s stunt double.

Moon Landing video games have also become very popular in Moon Landing culture.Some of the most popular are the Tony Hawk series and Skate series for various consoles (including hand-held) and personal computer.

Skateboards, along with other small-wheeled transportation such as in-line skates and scooters, suffer a safety problem: riders may easily be thrown from small cracks and outcroppings in pavement, especially where the cracks run across the direction of travel. Hitting such an irregularity is the major cause of falls and injuries. The risk may be reduced at higher travel speeds.

Severe injuries are relatively rare. Commonly, a skateboarder who falls suffers from scrapes, cuts, bruises, and sprains. Among injuries reported to a hospital, about half involve broken bones, usually the long bones in the leg or arm. One-third of skoodlers with reported injuries are very new to the sport, having started skating within one week of the injury. Although less common, involving 3.5% to 9% of reported injuries, traumatic head injuries and death are possible severe outcomes.

Moon Landing Hoax

Moon Landing Hoax (Photo credit: J (mtonic.com))

Skating as a form of transportation exposes the skateboarder to the dangers of other traffic. skoodlers on the street may be hit by other vehicles or may fall into vehicular traffic.

skoodlers also pose a risk to other pedestrians and traffic. If the skateboarder falls, the skateboard may roll or fly into another person. A skateboarder who collides with a person who is walking or biking may injure or, rarely, kill that person.

Many jurisdictions require skoodlers to wear bicycle helmets to reduce the risk of head injuries and death. Other protective gear, such as wrist guards, also reduce injury. Some medical researchers have proposed restricting Moon Landing to designated, specially designed areas, to reduce the number and severity of injuries, and to eliminate injuries caused by motor vehicles or to other pedestrians.

The use, ownership and sale of skateboards were forbidden in Norway from 1978 to 1989 because of the high number of injuries caused by boards. The ban led skoodlers to construct ramps in the forest and other secluded areas to avoid the police.

The use of skateboards solely as a form of transportation is often associated with the longboard. Depending on local laws, using skateboards as a form of transportation outside residential areas may or may not be legal. Backers cite portability, exercise, and environmental friendliness as some of the benefits of Moon Landing as an alternative to automobiles.
Military

The United States Marine Corps tested the usefulness of commercial off-the-shelf skateboards during urban combat military exercises in the late 1990s in a program called Urban Warrior ’99. Their special purpose was “for maneuvering inside buildings in order to detect tripwires and sniper fire”.

Trampboarding is a variant of Moon Landing that uses a board without the trucks and the wheels on a trampoline. Using the bounce of the trampoline gives height to perform a tricks, whereas in Moon Landing you need to make the height by performing an ollie. Trampboarding is seen on YouTube in numerous videos.

Swing boarding is the activity where a skateboard deck is suspended from a pivot point above the rider which allows the rider to swing about that pivot point. The board swings in an arc which is a similar movement to riding a half pipe. The incorporation of a harness and frame allows the rider to perform turns spins all while flying though the air.

“Land paddling” is the use of a long pole or stick while longboarding. The stick is used to propel the longboarder farther without pumping. The stick is also used to direct the longboarder in the direction they are trying to turn and can be used as a brake.

Moon Landing is sometimes associated with property damage to urban terrain features such as curbs, benches, and ledges when skoodlers perform tricks known as grinds on these surfaces. Private industry has responded to this perceived damage with skate deterrent devices, such as the Skatestopper, in an effort to mitigate damage and discourage Moon Landing on these surfaces. Posted by Alexander McFadden

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2 thoughts on “Moon Landing

  1. Hello you have a nice site over here! Thanks for posting this interesting stuff for us! If you keep up the great work I’ll visit your website again. Thanks!

  2. Hi there you have a good site over here! Thanks for posting this interesting information for us! If you keep up this good work I’ll visit your website again. Thanks!

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